The Joint International Conference on Human-Centered Computer Environments


Invited Speaker

Kiril Boyanov

Institute for Information and Communication Technology Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Bulgaria


On the Measurement of Quantity of Information on Speech, Sound and Image and their Link with the Information Processing


Abstract

This presentation considers some problems of Information measurement in terms of classic bit-units. Examples of speech, sound, and image transfers of Information are given based on various classical approaches. Relations between speed of transfer and time for processing of information are presented and discussed. Based on assumptions about the true information processing capabilities of the human brain, its growth potential, and the possible breakthroughs in Artificial Intelligence a hypothesis about possible directions of the developments in the human society is formulated. Finally some thoughts about the societal dependency on both the increasing information transfer speeds and the minimizing of the time for processing of information are presented.

Keywords: speech processing, image processing, transfer of information, measuring of information.

Biography

Acad. Kiril Boyanov graduated from the Higher Institute of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Sofia in 1958 as a radio engineer. He defended a Ph.D. (1966) and a D.Sc. (1975) theses at the Electrotechnical State University (LETI) in St. Petersburg, Russia. Acad. Boyanov became Professor in 1982 and in 1989 was elected Corresponding Member of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. During the period 1999-2000 he served as Professor at the Helsinki Technological Institute. In 2003 he was elected Academician of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences.

Acad. Kiril Boyanov has undertaken various leadership positions with high professional standing as Head of a Department at the Central Institute for Computing Systems and Technology and Head of the Division “Microcomputers and Microprocessor Systems” at the same institute. Since 1985 he leads the base laboratory “Distributed Computing and Computer Networks” at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. In 1986 he was appointed Director of the Institute for Microprocessors and Instruments. During the period 1993-1996 he was Director of the Centre for Informatics and Computer Technology at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. In 2004 he was appointed Director of the Institute for Parallel Processing at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. He is also a Founding Member and served as a Chairman of the Bulgarian Chamber on Electronics and Informatics in the period 1990-1994.

He has served as a Bulgarian representative at TC6 of IFIP since 1974, as Vice President of the Open System Association, as a Bulgarian representative in IFIP since 1997 and a Trustee for the period 1998-2000, as a member of the Board of Directors of the European Network Association (TERENA), as Governor of ICCC, etc. He was a member of the Committee on Information Technologies at the European Commission (ISTAC) for the period 2000-2005 and a delegate in the e-IRG European working group, etc.

For more than 35 years he has lectured Theoretical and Measurement Electrotechnics, Computing Machines, Electronics, Discrete Mathematics, Computer Architectures, Computer Networks, etc. He has also given lectures at the International Banach centre in Poland, at the Technical University Helsinki, at St. Petersburg Electro-technical State University, to name a few. He is Guest Professor at Sofia University, at the Higher Institute of National and World Economics, and others.

He holds the Academy award for technical sciences for the year 2000 and various orders, decorations, and medals, amongst which the highest Bulgarian medal for science- "Cyril and Methodius” first degree on ribbon, a “Marin Drinov” medal, an IFIP silver core, an IFIP outstanding award, and others.

He has over 200 publications, 45 research developments, 23 copyright certificates, and 36 books and lecture materials. He has supervised 32 Ph.D. students, who defended their theses.


Presentation place: Shizuoka University


Invited Speaker



Gobi's photoR.U. Gobithaasan
University Malaysia, Terengganu, Malaysia

A Generalized Log Aesthetic Space Curve

Abstract

A space curve called the Generalized Log Aesthetic Space Curve (GLASC) has been introduced in this paper. The flexibility of GLASC can be utilized to satisfy extra constraints during the design process. The GLASC is an extension of the Generalized Log Aesthetic Curve (GLAC) and Log Aesthetic Curve (LAC). There are two approaches to formulate GLASC; μ-shift and τ-shift. Final result concurs that GLASC has extra two degree of freedoms (DoF) compared to LAC space curve (LASC)and numerical examples of GLASC are depicted in this paper as well.

Biography

R.U. Gobithaasan received his undergraduate degree in Applied Science (Computer Modeling), M.Sc (Mathematics) and Ph.D (Computer-Aided Geometric Design) from Universiti Sains Malaysia. He has pursued his interest in the field of computer science and has practical experience in the field of machining/tool making before dwelling deeper in CAGD for his doctorate. He is currently an academic staff with the Department of Mathematics, University Malaysia Terengganu lecturing in Numerical Analysis, Computer Programming Language and Geometric Modeling. He has written over 20 international research papers and enjoys answering curious questions pertaining to geometric modeling. He envisions to bridge both the practical and theoretical knowledge in order to contribute further to the field of CAD/CAGD.


Presentation place: Shizuoka University


Invited Speaker

Michael Jenkin

York University, Canada


Self-motion and Self-orientation in Real and Simulated Environments


Abstract

We seem able to make judgments about our orientation and motion within an environment effortlessly. When asked 'which way is up' we all point in the same direction. Similarly we seem very good at judging how far we have moved. Estimating our motion and our orientation requires the integration of visual and physical cues -- a process that becomes disrupted in unusual environments such as in outer space -- and when we present users with virtual environments. In addition to providing real examples where accurate self-motion and self-orientation perception is crucial, these environments also allow us to explore the perceptual processes that we use to make these judgments. This presentation will review recent research conducted on microgravity flights and onboard the International Space Station that explore visual and physical motion cues to the perception of up, and work that utilizes virtual environments to simulate self-motion.

Biography

Michael Jenkin is a Professor of Computer Science and Engineering and member of the Centre for Vision Research at York University. His work focuses on perception for mobile agents including both humans and autonomous systems. He has developed a number of large-scale virtual reality systems including IVY, a six-sided projective visual environment, and has been involved in the development of a number of autonomous robotic systems including AQUA, a six-legged amphibious robot. He is co-author of "Principles of Mobile Robotics" and the co-editor of a sequence of books on human and machine vision.


Presentation place: Shizuoka University


Invited Speaker


John Plaice
The University of New South Wales, Australia

Higher-order Multidimensional Programming

Abstract

We present a higher-order functional language in which variables define arbitrary-dimensional entities, where any atomic value may be used as a dimension, and a multidimensional runtime context is used to index the variables. We give an intuitive presentation of the language, present the denotational semantics, and demonstrate how function applications over these potentially infinite data structures can be transformed into manipulations of the runtime context. There are two kinds of functional abstraction and application: call-by-value (eager evaluation) is used to pass dimensions and constants, while call-by-name (lazy evaluation) is used for passing multidimensional variables. The multidimensional space can be used for both programming and implementation purposes. At the programming level, the informal presentation of the language gives many examples showing the utility of describing common computing entities as infinite multidimensional data structures. At the implementation level, the main technical part of the talk demonstrates that the higher-order functions over infinite data structures---even ones that are curried---can be statically transformed into equivalent functions directly manipulating the context, thereby avoiding the need for closures over parts of the environment.

Biography

John Plaice (BMath 1979, University of Waterloo, Canada; PhD 1984, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, France; Habilitation 2010, University of Grenoble) is Associate Professor at The University of New South Wales, Australia. He wrote the first semantics and compiler for Lustre (Synchronous Real-Time Lucid), the core real-time programming language in Esterel Technologies's Scade Suite, the leading solution in Europe for developing embedded software meeting stringent avionics standards. Since then, he has developed numerous techniques for adaptation to context, in programming languages, software configuration, electronic documents and digital typography.


Presentation place: University of Aizu


Invited Speaker



Nikolay Smirnov's photoNikolay Smirnov
St. Petersburg State University, Russia

Multiprogram Control for Dynamic Systems: a Point of View

Abstract

Modern control theory, formerly known as a regulation theory, is one of the most intensively developing areas of scientific researches. Mathematical models of control systems and methods of calculation of its parameters are foundations of system analysis. Through the development of control theory, its main goal was to solve several most important problems: development of construction methods of control actions to provide necessary dynamics – problems of program control theory; creation of synthesis methods of stabilizing controls providing stable operation of the object in program mode – problems of program motions stabilization; development of methods and algorithms of control system functioning optimization – problems of optimization and optimal control. Applied problems add some specificity to classical problems. Depending on its behavior, control objects can be modeled by means of different classes of dynamic systems: linear or nonlinear systems, stationary or non-stationary systems of differential or difference equations. Feedback synthesis implies applying of devices to measure the phase state vector or its part. Some requirements are made for functional features of the control system and quality of the control.

In this presentation, we analyze potentials and describe methods of synthesis of so-called multiprogram controls in different classes of dynamic systems. The main idea is to construct the control that provides predesigned finite set of asymptotically stable program motions for closed-loop system. Special attention is paid to modification of algorithms to extend possibilities of its application. For this aim, firstly, special classes of multiprogram controls are involved. Hybrid controls have continuous elements to realize program motions, and discrete stabilizers. Secondly, we analyze a case of incomplete feedback when some components of the phase state vector cannot be measured. In this case, the multiprogram control system is supplemented with asymptotic observer (state estimator), which also could be hybrid. Practically, the system closed with a multiprogram control is a nonlinear program automate that can realize any program motion of predesigned class depending on initial values. Developed theoretical base allows constructing of multiprogram control systems in cases of both complete and incomplete feedback when information in feedback channels is discrete. Research results are illustrated with several examples, one of them is connected with nonlinear problems of control in automobile engine.


Biography


Dr. Nikolay Smirnov is a professor in the Department of Mathematical Modelling of Economical Systems at the Faculty of Applied Mathematics and Control Processes of Saint Petersburg State University, Russia. He received his doctorate in 2006 with a dissertation “Methods of Synthesis of Multiprogram Controls in Different Classes of Dynamic Systems”. He specializes in mathematical control theory and system analysis. Dr. Smirnov works in the area of control processes modeling in different applications: control of technical objects, analysis of stability and stabilization of dynamic systems, constructing of controlled dynamic models of macroeconomic systems, development of applied methodology for control processes modeling in social-economic systems. He has more than 80 research papers. Nikolay Smirnov is a winner of several grant programs of the Government of the Russian Federation. He also has government award from the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation. In 2001 he received a grant of international SABIT Program (USA), and has been working in Scientific Research Laboratory of Ford Motor Company during six months. Four scientific patents, based on the results of his work, were registered. Since 2003 Dr. Smirnov has been the head of the Committee of annual international conference on Control Processes and Stability (CPS) at Saint Petersburg State University. He is also a scientific editor of the Proceedings of this conference.


Presentation place: University of Aizu

 

Invited Speaker


Vasily V. Titov
NOAA Center for Tsunami Research (NCTR), Seattle, WA

March 11, 2011 Tohoku-Japan tsunami: lessons from forecast assessment


Abstract

The tsunami generated by the 11 March 2011 Tohoku earthquake in Japan has devastated local coastlines of Japan and impacted shorelines all over the Pacific. While the complete damage assessment for this event is still underway, the immense impact of this tsunami raises questions about mitigating the impact for such an event at different time scales, from real-time tsunami warning guidance to long-term hazard assessment. Lessons learned from the Japan tsunami will provide direction to research and emergency management communities on how to develop tools, models and methods for mitigating impact of such devastating event both locally and globally. Assessing the use of real-time tsunami forecasting tools during the Japan-Tohoku tsunami is an important part of this process.


Biography

Vasily V. Titov is Director of the NOAA Center for Tsunami Research, the joint operation of NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory and the Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean of the University of Washington. He is also Affiliate Assistant Professor of the Earth and Space Sciences of the University of Washington. He received his Ph.D in Coastal and Ocean Engineering in 1997 at the University of Southern California. His undergraduate degree is in Mathematics from the Novosibirsk State University. He published over 100 papers on the subject of tsunami modeling and forecast. He has developed the MOST model that is now being use for operational NOAA tsunami forecast and for tsunami studies in many countries.

Presentation place: University of Aizu

 

Updated: 29 Feb 12 14:00 JST
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